Françoise Hardy - Mon amie la rose


 
AccueilBlogMurAccueilDiscographieParolesReprisesVidéosPresseLiensGalerieFAQS'enregistrerRechercherConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
sundridge18
Passionné
Passionné
avatar

Féminin Nombre de messages : 581
Age : 68
Localisation : Royaume Uni
Date d'inscription : 02/01/2010

Message(#) Sujet: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Dim 14 Avr 2013 - 17:42

Maintenant un article dans le magazine "Culture" de "The Sunday Times" 14 avril 2013.

We love her yé-yé-yé
Swinging London fell in love with her image. Let’s now fall for Françoise Hardy’s music
Garth Cartwright
Published: 14 April 2013
[Vous devez être inscrit et connecté pour voir cette image]
Still mad for it: Françoise Hardy (Stuart Kirkham)
Françoise Hardy, timeless icon of Parisian pop, opens the door to her Paris apartment, signals for my translator and me to enter, then declines to shake hands. “Germs are spread by hands,” she explains. Here we go, I think: diva time.
“I am very old,” says the singer, who recently turned 69, by way of explanation, “and I am no longer strong. I get so tired.” Hardy is thin — but she was always slim — wears no make-up and her once perfect features are now heavily lined. Unlike many a celebrity pensioner, she has avoided the surgeon’s knife: in life, as in music, Hardy is devoid of artifice. I’m here to discuss her 50 years of music-making — although, typically, she claims ignorance of said anniversary until EMI emphasised it — and her superb new album, L’Amour fou (Mad Love).
L’Amour fou’s 10 original songs are contemporary chansons that find Hardy crooning over ambient piano and the ­Macedonian Radio Symphonic Orchestra’s striking string arrange­ments. Hardy has always excelled at suggesting the murmuring of a wayward heart, and L’Amour fou finds her little ­happier than when she first won huge international attention with 1962’s Tous les garçons et les filles. Back then she sang: “All the guys and girls my age know how it feels to be happy, but I am lonely. When will I know how it feels to have someone?” Hardy now sings with a world-weariness that comes with knowing how it feels “to have someone”.
“I’ve always had a very difficult, tormented love life,” she says when I ask what inspired L’Amour fou. She then laughs at herself — for someone so melancholic, she laughs a lot. “Also, I like reading, especially melodrama and, at present, 19th-century English literature. Especially Henry James. OK, he’s American, but he lived in ­England. I find myself through these books.”
I tell Hardy that L’Amour fou is a stronger album than recent efforts by her old admirers David Bowie and Bob Dylan. She smiles at this, then looks gloomy and explains that the album did not find a wide audience when issued in France.
“Radio did not play it. Radio only plays music for kids, and for an artist like myself who does not tour, well, I need radio.”
This surprises me, as Hardy is hugely admired in France and, over the past decade, has released a series of strong albums, a bestselling autobiography and, to coincide with L’Amour fou, a collection of short stories also called L’Amour fou.
“My publisher wanted another book after my autobiography did well,” she says, “and I had these stories originally written for myself many years ago. Stories exploring the pain of love. He encouraged me to rewrite them and they came out in conjunction with the album.”
On L’Amour fou, Hardy swings a literary connection by turning a Victor Hugo poem into a lyric. “I’m not especially a fan of Victor Hugo,” she says with a very Gallic shrug, “but a musician had written a melody to this poem and sent it to me. I liked the ­melody, and while I generally do not like poems, this one was a marvel of simplicity. It goes: ‘Why are you coming to see me if you have nothing to tell me?’ I like that.”
Across the 1960s, Hardy epitomised French beauty and style. While her looks certainly helped her win international fame, her music was strong enough to ensure that she became the only French singer to succeed in ­Beatles-era Britain. She hit the UK Top 40 three times across 1964-65, often performing and recording in London. Musicians including John Paul Jones, soon to join Led Zeppelin, and Mick Jones, later to lead Foreigner, backed her — yet Hardy reserves her ­fullest praise for the now largely forgotten British arrangers Charles Blackwell and Tony Cox, both of whom she worked with closely during the mid-1960s.
“In France the musicians were not very good at all, and what I found is that only English musicians could play with me on these songs. Also, I felt there was a disrespect for young singers in France, while I did not feel this in England.”
Last month, a 1965 documentary featuring Hardy singing her hits in London locations was posted on the website Dangerous Minds. How, I wondered, did the epitome of Parisian chic find Swinging London?
“Oui, I liked London. I performed at the Savoy three times, and after the concerts I would go to clubs, as they were the only places in London where you could eat late back then. What struck me was how you could go to a club and meet all these famous musicians — the Beatles, Stones, Animals, Georgie Fame. In Paris, this did not happen.”
If Hardy liked London, it is fitting, as London loved her: Mick Jagger called her his “ideal woman”, Brian Jones tried to seduce her (and failed), David Bowie stated, “I was for a very long time passionately in love with her. Every male in the world, and a number of females, also were.” Even Bob Dylan fell hard for Hardy, beginning a poem on the back of his 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan “for françoise hardy / at the seine’s edge”. Dylan would famously demand Hardy come backstage during the intermission of his debut Paris concert, and later that evening serenade her with I Want You and Just Like a Woman in his hotel room. Hardy, standing almost 6ft, refused the tiny American’s overtures. “He was very thin and small and did not look healthy.”
Being muse to the greatest ­figures in 1960s British and American pop music must have made her feel very special?
“All these big artists were in love with my image,” she replies. “They did not know my songs. My genre is so much different from what they like. So you cannot say I was truly their muse. What I think happened was they probably saw me on TV and they liked what they saw!”
I somehow doubt this, as admiration for Hardy — as muse and musician — continues across the decades, with the likes of Blur, Malcolm McLaren and Iggy Pop all having travelled to Paris to record with her. For the record, she liked Blur and Iggy, yet found that McLaren “treated people like objects”. Of her many admirers and collaborators, Hardy retains greatest affection for Serge Gainsbourg, the late French singer-songwriter and producer who also recorded with (and seduced) the likes of Brigitte Bardot and Jane Birkin.
“In France, Serge is one of our greatest artists, and to my family he was a really close friend. But he was like one of his songs, a Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde — when he was sober he was very charming, but when he was drunk he could be unpleasant. He was a genius and a warm, funny man. But he drank and drank, and I knew he was going to die. It was very sad. With his passing, I felt the ­passing of my youth.”
While Hardy has consistently recorded over the decades —beyond taking much of the 1990s off to write several books on astrology — she now refuses to perform. Was this, as is rumoured, due to stage fright?
“No. In 1967, my relationship with Jacques Dutronc started and I wanted to be with him rather than to be always on tour. With my first big love affair, my boyfriend was a photographer and I was away all the time, and when I came back to Paris he would be about to go away to work. So I cried all the time. This made me decide to stop touring.”
Dutronc, a celebrated French musician and actor, remains ­Hardy’s partner to this day. Yet he chooses to live in Corsica while she stays in Paris. This ­situation surely feeds Hardy’s “l’amour fou” ethos.
“Yes, I am romantic,” says the timeless icon with a wry smile. “This is my life.”
L’Amour fou is out tomorrow; the book is available in paperback
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Jérôme
Administrateur
Administrateur
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 8324
Age : 54
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 04/08/2007

Message(#) Sujet: Re: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Dim 14 Avr 2013 - 21:10

Merci Sundridge. Voici ma traduction. Wink

Françoise Hardy, icône éternelle de la pop parisienne, ouvre la porte de son appartement de Paris, nous fait signe à moi et à mon interprète d'entrer, et décline notre invitation à nous serrer la main. “Les microbes se transmettent par les mains”, explique-t-elle. Nous y voilà me dis-je à moi-même : l'heure de la diva a sonné.

“Je suis très âgée" dit la chanteuse, qui a récemment fêté ses 69 ans, en guise d'explication, “et je ne suis plus très forte. Je suis très fatiguée.” Hardy est mince — mais elle l'a toujours été — elle ne porte aucun maquillage et ses traits autrefois parfaits sont désormais fortement marqués. A l'inverse de nombreux pensionnaires de la célébrité, elle n'a pas eu recours au scalpel du chirurgien : dans la vie, comme en musique, Hardy est dépourvue d'artifices. Je suis là pour discuter de ses 50 ans de carrière dans la musique — même si, de façon typique, elle déclare avoir ignoré cet anniversaire jusqu'à ce que EMI le mette en relief — et de son superbe nouvel album, L’Amour fou.

Les 10 chansons originales de L’Amour sont des chansons d'aujourd'hui dans lesquelles Hardy fredonne sur un piano d'ambiance et sur les époustouflants arrangements de cordes du Macedonian Radio Symphonic Orchestra.

Hardy a toujours excellé dans l'interprétation de murmures d'un cœur rebelle, et L’Amour fou la place dans une situation un peu plus heureuse que celle qui lui avait fait gagner pour la première fois une énorme renommée internationale avec Tous les garçons et les filles en 1962.
A l'époque elle chantait : “Tous les garçons et les filles de mon âge savent très bien ce que c'est qu'être heureux, mais moi je suis seule, Quand saurai-je ce que ça fait d'être avec quelqu'un ?". Aujourd'hui, Hardy chante avec la lassitude au monde qui apparaît quand on sait ce que l'on ressent quand on a quelqu'un.

"J'ai toujours eu une vie amoureuse très difficile et tourmentée." dit-elle quand je lui demande ce qui lui a inspiré L'amour fou. Elle se met ensuite à rire d'elle-même — pour quelqu'un de si mélancolique, elle rit beaucoup. "Et puis, j'aime lire, en particulier les mélodrames et, en ce moment, la littérature anglaise du 19ème siècle. En particulier Henry James. D'accord il est américain, mais il a vécu en Angleterre. Je me retrouve à travers ces livres.”

Je dis à Hardy que L'amour fou est un album plus fort que les récentes publications de ses vieux admirateurs David Bowie et Bob Dylan. Elle sourit de ça, puis s'assombrit et explique que l'album n'a pas trouvé une large audience lors de sa sortie en France.

“Les radios ne le passaient pas. Les radios diffusent uniquement de la musique pour les jeunes et pour une artiste comme moi qui ne fait pas de tournée, eh bien, j'ai besoin des radios”. Cette déclaration me surprend : Hardy est largement admirée en France, elle a sorti une série d'albums majeurs dans la dernière décennie, une autobiographie qui a été un best-seller et simultanément à L'amour fou, un recueil de courts récits aussi appelé L'amour fou.

“Mon éditeur voulait un autre livre après le succès de mon autobiographie" dit-elle "et j'avais à ma disposition ces récits originaux écrits pour moi-même il y a de nombreuses années. Ces récits explorent les douleurs de l'amour. Il m'a encouragé à les réécrire et ils sont sortis conjointement à l'album".

Sur L’Amour fou, Hardy établit une connexion littéraire en transformant un poème de Victor Hugo en paroles de chanson. “Je ne suis pas particulièrement fan de Victor Hugo,” dit-elle avec un haussement d'épaule très gaulois, “mais un musicien avait écrit une mélodie pour ce poème et me l'avait envoyée. J'aimais la mélodie et alors que je n'aime généralement pas les poèmes, celui-ci s'est révélé une merveille de simplicité. Il fait : "Pourquoi venir auprès de moi si vous n'avez rien à me dire ? J'aime ça".

Dans les années 1960, Hardy incarnait la beauté et le style français. Bien que son apparence a certainement aidé à gagner une renommée internationale, sa musique était assez forte pour permettre qu'elle devienne la seule chanteuse française à réussir en Grande Bretagne durant l'ère Beatles. Elle est entrée trois fois au Top 40 britannique pendant la période 1964-65, jouant et enregistrant souvent à Londres. Des musiciens tels que John Paul Jones, qui devait bientôt rejoindre Led Zeppelin, et Mick Jones, qui plus tard rejoindrait Foreigner, l'ont accompagnée - cependant Hardy réserve ses louanges pour des arrangeurs britanniques, aujourd'hui largement oubliés, Charles Blackwell et Tony Cox, avec qui elle a beaucoup travaillé au milieu des années 1960.

"En France, les musiciens n'étaient pas très bons du tout, et je me suis aperçue que seuls les musiciens anglais étaient capables de m'accompagner sur ces chansons. Et puis, en France je rencontrais un manque de respect pour les jeunes chanteurs, tandis que je ne ressentais pas ça en Angleterre". Le mois dernier, un documentaire de 1965 montrant Hardy chantant ses tubes dans divers endroits de Londres a été posté sur le site Dangerous Minds. Je me demande comment l'incarnation du chic parisien se retrouvait dans le Swinging London ?
“Oui, j'aimais Londres. J'ai chanté trois fois à l'hôtel Savoy, et après les concerts je fréquentais les clubs, parce que c'était à l'époque les seuls endroits de Londres où on pouvait dîner très tard. Ce qui me fascinait c'était que l'on pouvait aller dans un club et rencontrer tous ces musiciens célèbres — les Beatles, les Stones, les Animals, Georgie Fame. A Paris, ça ne se produisait pas.”

Si Hardy aimait Londres, ça tombait bien, car Londres l'aimait aussi : Mick Jagger l'appelait son “idéal féminin", Brian Jones essaya de la séduire (sans y parvenir), David Bowie a dit , “J'ai très longtemps été passionnément amoureux d'elle. Chaque homme dans le monde, et un nombre de femmes aussi". Même Bob Dylan avait un fort penchant pour Hardy, commençant un poème au dos de son album de 1964 Another Side of Bob Dylan : “for Françoise Hardy / at the seine’s edge”. Dylan aura cette célèbre exigence de voir Hardy dans les coulisses durant l'entracte d'un de ses premiers concerts à Paris, et plus tard dans la soirée lui fera la sérénade avec I want you et Just like a woman dans sa chambre d'hôtel. Hardy, qui mesure 1 mètre 72 déclinera les avances du petit Américain. “Il était très maigre et petit et ne semblait pas en bonne santé.”

Etre la muse des grandes figures de la pop musique britannique et américaine doit lui avoir donné une impression spéciale ? “Tous ces grands artistes étaient amoureux de mon image,” répond-elle. “Ils ne connaissaient pas mes chansons. Mon style est trop différent de ce qu'ils aiment. Alors vous ne pouvez pas dire que j'étais vraiment leur muse. Je pense que ce qui a dû se passer c'est qu'ils m'ont probablement vue à la télé et qu'ils ont aimé ce qu'ils ont vu !”

Quelque part j'ai des doutes là dessus, dans la mesure où l'admiration pour Hardy — en tant que muse et musicienne — se poursuit à travers les décennies, à l'instar de celle émanent de Blur, Malcolm McLaren et Iggy Pop, tous ayant voyagé à Paris pour enregistrer avec elle. Pour la petite histoire, elle a aimé Blur et Iggy, mais a trouvé que McLaren “traitait les gens comme des objets”. De ses nombreux admirateurs et de ses collaborations, Hardy conserve la plus grande affection pour Serge Gainsbourg, le regretté auteur-chanteur français et producteur qui avait également enregistré avec Brigitte Bardot et Jane Birkin (qu'il avait toutes deux séduites).

“En France, Serge est l'un de nos plus grands artistes, et pour ma famille il était réellement un ami très proche. Mais il était comme l'une de ses chansons, Dr Jekyll et Mr Hyde — quand il était sobre, il était tout à fait charmant, mais quand il était soul il pouvait être déplaisant. C'était un génie et un homme chaleureux et drôle. Mais il buvait et buvait et je savais qu'il allait mourir. C'était très triste. Quand il a disparu j'ai eu l'impression d'enterrer ma jeunesse.”

Alors qu'Hardy a enregistré régulièrement à travers les décennies — prenant un large break dans les années 90 pour écrire plusieurs livres d'astrologie — elle refuse désormais de chanter. Est-ce que c'est comme le propage la rumeur parce qu'elle avait peur de la scène ?
“Non. En 1967, ma relation avec Jacques Dutronc commençait et je préférais être avec lui plutôt qu'en tournée. Lors de ma première grande relation amoureuse, mon partenaire était photographe et j'étais tout le temps partie, et quand je revenais à Paris il était en reportage pour son travail. Alors je pleurais tout le temps. C'est ce qui m'a décidée à arrêter les tournées.”

Dutronc, célèbre musicien et acteur français, reste encore aujourd'hui le partenaire d'Hardy. Cependant il a choisi de vivre en Corse tandis qu'elle reste à Paris. Cette situation nourrit probablement l'amour fou d'Hardy.
“Oui, je suis romantique,” dit l'icône éternelle dans un sourire ironique. “C'est ma vie.”

L’Amour fou sort demain ; le livre est disponible en livre de poche
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mon-amie-hardy-rose.blogspot.com
Jérôme
Administrateur
Administrateur
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 8324
Age : 54
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 04/08/2007

Message(#) Sujet: Re: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Dim 14 Avr 2013 - 21:32

On peut voir avec cet article de presse plutôt long que Françoise Hardy est toujours vue comme une icône de l'autre côté de la Manche et qu'apparemment son disque fait mouche au niveau de la critique. clap

Espérons pour elle que le succès commercial sera aussi au rendez-vous, aujourd'hui et pas uniquement dans une autre vie. waou
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mon-amie-hardy-rose.blogspot.com
sundridge18
Passionné
Passionné
avatar

Féminin Nombre de messages : 581
Age : 68
Localisation : Royaume Uni
Date d'inscription : 02/01/2010

Message(#) Sujet: Re: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Lun 15 Avr 2013 - 0:44

Merci Jérôme pour votre traduction merveilleux. Sur la page suivante du magazine il y a aussi une critique très petite du dernier album de Carla Bruni.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Jérôme
Administrateur
Administrateur
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 8324
Age : 54
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 04/08/2007

Message(#) Sujet: Re: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Lun 15 Avr 2013 - 8:09

Pris sur le vif au coeur du journal, l'article a vraiment de l'allure... Ce n'est pas juste une petite mention dans un coin. clown

[Vous devez être inscrit et connecté pour voir cette image]
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mon-amie-hardy-rose.blogspot.com
Jérôme
Administrateur
Administrateur
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 8324
Age : 54
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 04/08/2007

Message(#) Sujet: Re: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Lun 15 Avr 2013 - 8:14

L'icône insouciante et inconsciente de sa beauté à l'époque du Swinging London. clown

[Vous devez être inscrit et connecté pour voir cette image]
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mon-amie-hardy-rose.blogspot.com
sundridge18
Passionné
Passionné
avatar

Féminin Nombre de messages : 581
Age : 68
Localisation : Royaume Uni
Date d'inscription : 02/01/2010

Message(#) Sujet: Re: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Lun 15 Avr 2013 - 11:04

Merci pour les photos Jerome. On lit (en jaune)"We love her". Un vrai compliment après 50 ans.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Alexandre
Modérateur
Modérateur
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 3574
Age : 44
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 06/08/2007

Message(#) Sujet: Re: 14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times Lun 15 Avr 2013 - 15:20

Cet article est de loin le plus élogieux. Je suis quand même étonné qu'on n'en parle que maintenant en Grande Bretagne, un peu comme si la sortie française n'avait pas existé. [Vous devez être inscrit et connecté pour voir cette image]

Si l'engouement critique parvient à toucher le public d'outre manche, nul doute que Françoise devrait faire un tabac. [Vous devez être inscrit et connecté pour voir cette image]

C'est un peu dommage qu'il fasse autant de teasing sur la période londonienne alors que parler de l'album devrait suffire en soi mais après tout si ça donne envie d'acheter le disque, pourquoi pas. [Vous devez être inscrit et connecté pour voir cette image]

Je tenais à signaler que je trouve que les deux photos postées par Jérôme sont très bien choisies pour illustrer le propos. [Vous devez être inscrit et connecté pour voir cette image]
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
14 avril 2013 - Sunday Times
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Françoise Hardy - Mon amie la rose :: Françoise à bâtons rompus :: Actualité de Françoise :: Archives :: L'amour fou (promo)-
Sauter vers: